Call-to-action (CTA) buttons that dare you to ‘click here’ _

Call-to-action (CTA) buttons that dare you to ‘click here’

Call-to-action (CTA) buttons that dare you to ‘click here’

Guys, it’s almost 2018. If you’re not incorporating a strong call-to-action (CTA) on your website or e-mail blast – you’re missing out! Just as Netflix leads to chill, CTAs are a direct path to conversions and revenue—and who doesn’t love a little ROI? (Hint: Everybody loves ROI, especially your boss).

What constitutes a ‘strong CTA’ you ask? Well, it starts with simplicity. As the old saying goes, “keep it simple, stupid.” But really. Nobody needs to read a novel to click a button – ain’t nobody got time for that. Keep the CTA clear, and present a challenge that incites action; use collaborative and personable language that speaks directly to your users. All of it starts with knowing your audience.

We’ve featured a few of the good guys below who know what’s up. Check out some of the latest and greatest examples of solid CTAs:

1. Netflix

Sometimes, a simple and effective CTA comes by addressing your user’s potential fear of commitment. People hate signing up for things they think will be hard to cancel. Netflix alleviates that fear by putting “Cancel anytime” copy above their CTA “Join free for a month,”  right on their homepage. This gives potential users an out, while still tapping into their desire (ahem, Netflix and chill – FOR FREE).

Netflix CTA

2. Uber

Uber does a great job of tying multiple CTAs into one platform (their website). They’re looking to reach drivers and riders, which require two different CTAs,  and they do just that with effortless and powerful copy. “Get there. Your day belongs to you.” Those words read well to both audiences, and drive them to either “sign up” or “sign in”. See what we did there?

Uber CTA

3. Square

A straightforward CTA requires you to relay your benefits quickly. And Square knows how to do just that. “Square works for any business.” “Accept credit cards anywhere.” This language immediately communicates how their product benefits their users. The CTAs on their website also provide clear direction on how to get started, making it easy for consumers to follow along.

Square CTA

4. Medium

Collaborative language is welcoming and warm. Medium does a great job of fostering community with their ambiguous and all-encompassing copy “…whatever your interest, we’ve got you covered,” followed by simple CTAs “Get started.” and “Learn more.” This kind of language accentuates the importance of the user’s needs and wants.

Medium CTA

5. InVision’s Newsroom

InVision knows a thing or two about good design so it’s no surprise their CTA copy is on point. Their newsroom CTA’s cleverly play off the pink in their logo, teasing visitors to visit their latest coverage with “Read all about it” or “Write on.” We love a good sense of humor and are curious, which CTA button nets the most click throughs?

InVision's Newsroom CTA

There are a lot of companies that know how to do a CTA right (more than five, obviously). And many that suck too, we might add. Sure, offering a promotion or discount could work, and yes, you could provide a variety of options—but, how do you know which technique is best for your brand? A/B testing is critical, and will help you learn exactly what your audience is looking for. Do that, and work to put the right message in front of the right audience at the right time and you’re in for some serious chill…err… revenue.

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